Pentagon watchdog on extremism reveals military has had most cases of racism, anti-government Marines

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The Pentagon’s anti-extremism watchdog released its first report, revealing that the U.S. military has had more incidents of suspected racist behavior than any other branch of the military.

A Defense Ministry inspector general report released on Wednesday revealed 33 allegations of “racially motivated violent extremism” within the military, with a similar number, 30, in the navy between Jan. September 30 of this year.

The Marine Corps had seven cases while the Air Force reported none, but this branch of the military is not immune to criticism – the report uncovered ten allegations its members attended the January 6 riot in Washington DC. Air Force bosses gathered all of his extremist incidents, and reported 160 in total, including unidentified members who allegedly participated in riots on Capitol Hill.

The highest number of racist incidents took place in the military with 34 incidents reported

The Air Force was also the only service to report an “intrusion on the United States Capitol.”

Regarding cases of anti-government / anti-authority behavior, the military has documented 34 cases, 14 in the Navy and 25 in the Marine Corps.

No cases were reported by the Air Force, but that doesn’t mean they were free from racist and anti-government behavior.

Instead, the Air Force classified all of its violent extremism cases, 102 in total, into a category titled “participation in domestic violence extremism.”

Anti-government extremism was also found to be much more common in the Marine Corps. No details of any of the extremism incidents have been shared, including the identity of those involved, what they did and how they were disciplined.

The Air Force was the only service to report a

The Air Force was the only service to report an “intrusion on the United States Capitol”

This is the first year that the Defense Department has undertaken to catalog and record such extremist and racist behavior, but Congress ordered it to do so long before the siege on Capitol Hill on January 6.

Hundreds of cases were reported in the first nine months of this year, but the Inspector General found the services struggling to collect their own data as there were no clear guidelines from the Secretary of Defense , Lloyd Austin’s office.

Austin has not given any clear direction to the various departments on standard practices for reporting and tracking extremist activity, and it also appears that there is no centralized method of cataloging such offenses and providing for appropriate penalties.

Of the reported cases, including dozens of racially motivated, anti-government or “domestic violence” allegations in the military, navy, marine corps and air force, ten have resulted in complaints being made. non-judicial sanctions, a court martial, 31 received “administrative actions” 18 others being treated as “unspecified sanctions”.

The Marine Corps encountered 25 incidents while the Navy reported 14

The Marine Corps encountered 25 incidents while the Navy reported 14

The military demands that all extremism investigations be reported to the Army’s Criminal Investigations Command, but there appears to be a lack of parity between the various branches.

The Navy follows court martial procedures against extremism in a centralized manner; the Marine Corps has also issued guidelines for reportable extremist behavior; and the Air Force is implementing a code for its legal case management system to clearly track allegations of extremism.

Each of the departments has worked on a case-by-case basis, working with the FBI when necessary and deferring to the Department of Justice if charges are laid.

The number of people involved has never been centralized by forces working with the FBI when allegations are made and defer to the Department of Justice when charges are laid.

The Air Force did not report any racist incidents but revealed 10 members were at headquarters on January 6 (file photo)

The Air Force did not report any racist incidents but revealed 10 members were at headquarters on January 6 (file photo)

The FBI, meanwhile, declined to provide specific numbers on which members of the military it investigated.

A new working definition of “extremism” is also expected to be provided to the forces and will be outlined in a report due to be released in July but which has been delayed.

“The report is almost complete,” Pentagon spokesman John Kirby said. Military time in October, adding: “And it will include, as we have talked about, a new set of definitions of what constitutes extremist activity.”

Until now, there has never been a precise method of recording such incidents.  Nor does it appear that there is a standard disciplinary procedure for those involved in such acts.  Members of the United States Marine Corps are pictured

Until now, there has never been a precise method of recording such incidents. Nor does it appear that there is a standard disciplinary procedure for those involved in such acts. Members of the United States Marine Corps are pictured


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