Working in Lanka, Pak is a big challenge, says veteran scribe – The New Indian Express

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By Express press service

HYDERABAD: “A phone repairman gathered a crowd of people after seeing a letter from the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE). I was about to be arrested and even experienced what it would be like in police custody once. Working as an Indian journalist in countries like Sri Lanka, Pakistan and Afghanistan is always a challenge at all levels as we have limited access to information,” said National Editor, Strategic Affairs, Indian Express Nirupama Subramanian while sharing his experiences in a webinar held on Friday. .

The webinar was organized by Hyderabad University in collaboration with South Asian Women in Media, a network of women media professionals. The Department of Communications, UoH, has launched a webinar series titled “Stories Without Borders – A Living Archive of South Asian Women in Media.” The first webinar, held on Friday, was a conversation with Nirupama Subramanian and Dilrukshi Handunetti, executive director of the Center for Investigative Reporting in Sri Lanka.

Subramanian covered the civil war in Sri Lanka when its war was at its height in the 1990s. “As I am Tamilian my surname was always a point of interest at checkpoints where I had to show my ID ‘identity,” she said, recounting her experiences during her days of reporting. There was a heightened sense of fear and vigilance that she fell victim to. Once his visa was restricted to Pakistan. She was based in Islamabad and was only able to travel to Karachi and Lahore.

She also often faced visa renewal issues. “In my freshman year, I was called into the information department and had crossed a lot of red lines in terms of what I was doing and who I was meeting,” Subramanian added.
Although people were reluctant to meet her in both places, she said she felt no threat from everyday people.

No exchange of journalists
Both panelists agreed that although South Asia has vibrant media and a strong journalism culture, the exchange of journalists between India and Pakistan is not happening. Indian newspapers send their reporters to Sri Lanka or appoint people from Bangladesh and Nepal to write for them. However, no country sends its correspondents to India.

“Getting a visa for any journalist is a long process. When our governments are not ready for this exchange, we can at least ask experts from neighboring countries to write for them. Likewise, I am writing a column for The New Indian Express,” said Dilrukshi Handunetti.

HYDERABAD: “A phone repairman gathered a crowd of people after seeing a letter from the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE). I was about to be arrested and even experienced what it would be like in police custody once. Working as an Indian journalist in countries like Sri Lanka, Pakistan and Afghanistan is always a challenge at all levels as we have limited access to information,” said National Editor, Strategic Affairs, Indian Express Nirupama Subramanian while sharing his experiences in a webinar held on Friday. . The webinar was organized by Hyderabad University in collaboration with South Asian Women in Media, a network of women media professionals. The Department of Communications, UoH, has launched a webinar series titled “Stories Without Borders – A Living Archive of South Asian Women in Media.” The first webinar, held on Friday, was a conversation with Nirupama Subramanian and Dilrukshi Handunetti, executive director of the Center for Investigative Reporting in Sri Lanka. Subramanian covered the civil war in Sri Lanka when its war was at its height in the 1990s. “As I am Tamilian my surname was always a point of interest at checkpoints where I had to show my ID ‘identity,” she said, recounting her experiences during her days of reporting. There was a heightened sense of fear and vigilance that she fell victim to. Once his visa was restricted to Pakistan. She was based in Islamabad and was only able to travel to Karachi and Lahore. She also often faced visa renewal issues. “In my freshman year, I was called into the information department and had crossed a lot of red lines in terms of what I was doing and who I was meeting,” Subramanian added. Although people were reluctant to meet her in both places, she said she felt no threat from everyday people. No exchange of journalists Both panelists agreed that although South Asia has a vibrant media and a strong journalism culture, the exchange of journalists between India and Pakistan is not taking place. Indian newspapers send their reporters to Sri Lanka or appoint people from Bangladesh and Nepal to write for them. However, no country sends its correspondents to India. “Getting a visa for any journalist is a long process. When our governments are not ready for this exchange, we can at least ask experts from neighboring countries to write for them. Likewise, I am writing a column for The New Indian Express,” said Dilrukshi Handunetti.

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